Sunday, July 31, 2011

Sunday, July 31, 2011

Today's Events:

7 p.m. - MFA Faculty and Administrator Reading: Sonya Huber, Kathryn Winograd, and Sarah M. Wells

About the Presenters:

Sonya Huber

Sonya Huber
Sonya Huber is the author of two books of creative nonfiction, Cover Me: A Health Insurance Memoir (University of Nebraska Press, 2010), finalist for the 2010 Grub Street National Book Prize in Nonfiction, and Opa Nobody (University of Nebraska Press, 2008), shortlisted for the Saroyan Prize. She has also written a textbook, The Backwards Research Guide for Writers: Using Your Life for Reflection, Connection, and Inspiration (Equinox Publishing, forthcoming). Her work has been published in literary journals and magazines including Fourth Genre, Passages North, Hotel Amerika, Crab Orchard Review, The Chronicle of Higher Education, and the Washington Post Magazine, in other journals and in many anthologies. She teaches in the Department of Writing and Linguistics at Georgia Southern University.


Kathryn Winograd

Kathryn Winograd
Kathryn Winograd poetry, is the author of Air into Breath (Ashland Poetry Press, 2002), a 2003 Colorado Book Award Winner in Poetry. Winograd has been the recipient of a Colorado Artist Fellowship in Poetry, a Rocky Mountain Women’s Institute Associateship, and a co-winner of a Colorado Endowment for The Humanities Grant. She is a poetry faculty member for the University of Northern Colorado’s Middle Ground Project, a collaboration with the Navajo Nation funded by a Presidential Academy in American History and Civics Education grant. Recent and forthcoming publications include Calyx, Cricket Magazine, Cutthroat, Fourth Genre, Hotel Amerika, Literary Mama, and River Teeth.


Winograd is the co-author of two books on online learning and teaching, You Can Learn Online and You Can Teach Online (McGraw Hill, 2002) and author of Stepping Sideways Into Poetry (Scholastic, Inc., 2005), a classroom resource book for K12 teachers. Her poetry has appeared in literary journals such as TriQuarterly, The Denver Quarterly, The Colorado Review, The Journal, The Antioch Review, Kalliope, The Ohio Review, The Cincinnati Review, Water-Stone, Poets Laureate, Weber Studies and The New Yorker. She has published numerous articles and essays in publications such as Iris: A Journal Abut Women, Bloomsbury Review, The Herb Companion, Mountain Living, Natural Homes Magazine, Adjunct Advocate, Winds of Change, and Converge Magazine, as well as children's stories and poems in Cricket magazine and Shoofly: An Audio Magazine for Children. Her work has been nominated for the Pushcart Prize. Winograd received her Ph.D. in Literature and Creative Writing from the University of Denver, and a M.F.A. from the University of Iowa.

Sarah M. Wells
Sarah M. Wells

Sarah M. Wells, MFA Administrative Director, is the author of Acquiesce (Finishing Line Press, March 2009), winner of the 2008 Starting Gate Award. Her poetry has appeared or is forthcoming in Nimrod, Christianity & Literature, JAMA, Poetry East, The Fourth River, Ascent, Literary Mama, Alimentum, The New Formalist and elsewhere. She has received scholarships to attend the Key West Literary Seminar and West Chester Poetry Conference. Wells serves as the Managing Editor for the Ashland Poetry Press and River Teeth: A Journal of Nonfiction Narrative. She lives in Ashland with her husband, Brandon, and their three young children, Lydia, Elvis, and Henry.

Friday, July 29, 2011

Friday, July 29, 2011

Today's Events:

All posted events are located in the Schar College of Education Ronk Lecture Hall, Ashland University in Ashland, Ohio and are free and open to the public.

1-2:30 p.m. Craft Seminar with Tom French
7 p.m. Faculty Reading – Deborah Fleming and Joe Mackall



About the Presenters:


Thomas French

Thomas French, visiting writer in creative nonfiction, worked as a reporter for the St. Petersburg Times for 27 years, writing serialized book-length narratives that appeared in the newspaper one chapter at a time. One of his projects, Angels & Demons, was awarded a Pulitzer Prize for feature writing. French now teaches at Indiana University and in Goucher College's MFA program for creative nonfiction. He also teaches at the Poynter Institute for Media Studies and at writing conferences around the world, from Paris to Singapore to Johannesburg. He is the author of three nonfiction books, including Unanswered Cries, an account of a Florida murder case, and South of Heaven, the story of the secret lives of high school students. His most recent book, Zoo Story, is based on seven years of reporting and research and chronicles life and death inside Tampa's Lowry Park Zoo. A New York Times bestseller, Zoo Story was recently featured on The Colbert Report, in People Magazine and on NPR's Talk of the Nation.

Joe Mackall

Joe Mackall is the author of Plain Secrets: An Outsider among the Amish (Beacon Press, 2007) and The Last Street Before Cleveland: An Accidental Pilgrimage (University of Nebraska Press, 2006). He is the co-founder and co-editor of River Teeth: A Journal of Nonfiction Narrative and co-editor of the River Teeth Literary Nonfiction Book Prize Series (in partnership with the University of Nebraska Press).


His articles have been published in a number of newspapers and magazines, including The Washington Post and the Cleveland Plain Dealer. He wrote for The Washington Post for two years. He also served as editor of Cleveland Magazine. His essays have appeared in several anthologies, literary journals, and recently on National Public Radio’s “Morning Edition.” Mackall has a BA in English from Cleveland State University, an MA in English from the University of Central Oklahoma, an MFA in fiction writing from Bowling Green State University, and a Ph.D. in English from Indiana University of Pennsylvania. He is the director of the Creative Writing Program and Professor of English at Ashland University.


Deborah Fleming

Deborah Fleming, Professor of English, received her Ph.D. in 1985 from Ohio State University and is Chair of the Department and Editor of the Ashland Poetry Press. Her research interests include W. B. Yeats, Robinson Jeffers, Anglo-Irish Literature, Modern Poetry, and Environmentalist Literature. She is author of “A man who does not exist”: The Irish Peasant in W. B. Yeats and J. M. Synge from the University of Michigan Press and articles in such journals as Jeffers Studies, Eire-Ireland, and Papers in Comparative Literature. She has published a chapbook of poetry, Migrations, and individual poems appear in such journals as Hiram Poetry Review, Organization and Environment, Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment, Karamu, Cottonwood, Pennsylvania Review, and Blueline. A collection of poems, Morning, Winter Solstice, is forthcoming.  She received the Vandewater Poetry Award from Ohio State and a fellowship from the National Endowment for Humanities, and she had been a keynote speaker at the W. B. Yeats Society of New York and the Tor House Foundation Fall Festival.

Thursday, July 28, 2011

Thursday, July 28, 2011

Today's Events:

All posted events are located in the Schar College of Education Ronk Lecture Hall, Ashland University in Ashland, Ohio and are free and open to the public.

1-2:30 p.m. Poetry Faculty Craft Seminar: “Poetry and Memorability” with Mark Irwin and Peter Campion
7 p.m. Visiting Writer Reading: Tom French

About the Presenters:

Peter Campion
Peter Campion
Peter Campion, poetry, is the author of The Lions: Poems (University of Chicago Press, 2009), winner of the 2010 Larry Levis Reading Prize, Other People, (University of Chicago Press, 2005) and Mitchell Johnson (Terrence Rogers Fine Art, 2004). He was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in Poetry in 2011. He was also the 2009 recipient of the Rome Fellowship in Literature from The American Academy of Arts and Letters and has held a George Starbuck Lectureship at Boston University, as well as a Wallace Stegner Fellowship and Jones Lecturership at Stanford University. His poetry and prose have appeared recently in The Boston Globe, Modern Painters, The New Republic, Parnassus, Poetry, Poetry Northwest, Tikkun, The Yale Review and elsewhere. His monograph on the painter Joseph McNamara was published by The Seven Bridges Foundation. He has published catalog essays on such painters as Terry St. John, Kim Frohsin, Eric Aho, and Siddharth Parasnis. He won a Pushcart Prize in 2008.

Campion is the editor of the journal Literary Imagination. He is currently Assistant Professor of English at the University of Minnesota where he teaches creative writing, modern and contemporary poetry, prosody, and poetry and the visual arts.


Thomas French
Thomas French
Thomas French, visiting writer in creative nonfiction, worked as a reporter for the St. Petersburg Times for 27 years, writing serialized book-length narratives that appeared in the newspaper one chapter at a time. One of his projects, Angels & Demons, was awarded a Pulitzer Prize for feature writing. French now teaches at Indiana University and in Goucher College's MFA program for creative nonfiction. He also teaches at the Poynter Institute for Media Studies and at writing conferences around the world, from Paris to Singapore to Johannesburg. He is the author of three nonfiction books, including Unanswered Cries, an account of a Florida murder case, and South of Heaven, the story of the secret lives of high school students. His most recent book, Zoo Story, is based on seven years of reporting and research and chronicles life and death inside Tampa's Lowry Park Zoo. A New York Times bestseller, Zoo Story was recently featured on The Colbert Report, in People Magazine and on NPR's Talk of the Nation.


Mark Irwin
Mark Irwin, poetry, was born in Faribault, Minnesota, and has lived throughout the United States and abroad in France and Italy. His poetry and essays have appeared widely in many literary magazines including The American Poetry Review, The Atlantic, Georgia Review, The Kenyon Review, Paris Review, Poetry, The Nation, New England Review, and the New Republic. A graduate of the Iowa Writer’s Workshop (M.F.A.), he also holds a Ph.D. in English/Comparative Literature and has taught at a number of universities and colleges including Case Western Reserve, the University of Iowa, Ohio University, the University of Denver, the University of Colorado/Boulder, the University of Nevada, and Colorado College. 

Mark Irwin
The author of six collections of poetry, including The Halo of Desire (Galileo Press, 1987), Against the Meanwhile (Wesleyan University Press, 1989), Quick, Now, Always (BOA , 1996), White City (BOA, 2000), Bright Hunger (BOA, 2004), and Tall If (New Issues, 2008), he has also translated two volumes of poetry, one from the French and one from the Romanian. Recognition for his work includes The Nation/Discovery Award, four Pushcart Prizes, National Endowment for the Arts, Colorado and Ohio Art Council Fellowships, two Colorado Book Awards, the James Wright Poetry Award, and fellowships from the Fulbright, Lilly, and Wurlitzer Foundations. He lives in Colorado, and Los Angeles, where he teaches in the Graduate Creative Writing Program at the University of Southern California.


Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Today's Events:

All posted events are located in the Schar College of Education Ronk Lecture Hall, Ashland University in Ashland, Ohio and are free and open to the public.
 
7 p.m. MFA Faculty Reading: Bob Cowser, Ruth L. Schwartz, and Jill Christman
 
About Today's Presenters:


Jill Christman
Jill Christman

Jill Christman’s memoir, Darkroom: A Family Exposure, won the AWP Award Series in Creative Nonfiction and was published by the University of Georgia Press in 2002. Recent essays appearing in River Teeth and Harpur Palate have been honored by Pushcart nominations and her writing has been published in Barrelhouse, Brevity, Descant, Literary Mama, Mississippi Review, Wondertime, and many other journals, magazines, and anthologies. Her work has appeared on Indiana Public Radio and in anthologies, including Writer’s Digest’s Rules of Thumb, Unbuttoned: Women tell the truth about the pains, pleasures and politics of breastfeeding, and Literature: the Human Experience. She is an Associate Professor of English at Ball State University where she teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in creative nonfiction writing in the Creative Writing program and serves as Assistant Chair of Graduate and Undergraduate Programs in the Department of English.

Bob Cowser, Jr.
Bob Cowser, Jr.

Bob Cowser, Jr. is the author of three works of literary nonfiction and editor of a fourth. His most recent, Green Fields: Crime, Punishment, and a Boyhood Between, was published as part of the Engaged Writers Series at the University of New Orleans Press in 2010. A Professor of English at St. Lawrence University and on the faculty of the Low-Residency MFA at Ashland University, Cowser's essays and reviews have appeared widely in literary magazines and journals, including Creative Nonfiction, Fourth Genre, Brevity, and The Huffington Post. He lives on the Grasse River in Canton, NY with his wife Candace and their sons Jackson and Mason.

Ruth L. Schwartz
Ruth L. Schwartz, poetry, is the author of four books of poems, each the winner of a national award: Dear Good Naked Morning (Autumn House Press, 2005), selected by Alicia Ostriker for the 2004 Autumn House Poetry Prize; Edgewater (HarperCollins, 2002), a National Poetry Series winner chosen by Jane Hirshfield; Singular Bodies (Anhinga Press, 2001), recipient of the 2000 Anhinga Prize for Poetry; and Accordion Breathing and Dancing (University of Pittsburgh Press, 1996), winner of the 1994 Associated Writing Programs Competition. Her fifth collection of poems, Bone River, will be published by Autumn House Press in 2012. Ruth is also the author of a memoir, Death in Reverse: A Love Story (Michigan State University Press, 2004), and her creative nonfiction has appeared in the Utne Reader, The Sun, and numerous anthologies.

Ruth L. Schwartz
Recipient of over a dozen national writing awards, including fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Ohio Arts Council, and the Astraea Foundation, Ruth is also a lifelong explorer of consciousness and healing. In addition to her M.F.A. in Creative Writing, Ruth has a Ph.D. in Transpersonal Psychology, and offers workshops and retreats nationwide on the theme “The Writer As Shaman: Words as a Portal to the Soul.” Her website is http://www.thewriterasshaman.com/.

Tuesday, July 26, 2011

Tuesday, July 26, 2011

Today's Events:

All posted events are located in the Schar College of Education Ronk Lecture Hall, Ashland University in Ashland, Ohio and are free and open to the public.

1-2:30 p.m. Craft Seminar “Dancing in a Box” with Rhina Espaillat
7 p.m. MFA Faculty Reading: Stephen Haven, Peter Trachtenberg, and Peter Campion

About Today's Presenters:

Peter Campion
Peter Campion
Peter Campion, poetry, is the author of The Lions: Poems (University of Chicago Press, 2009), winner of the 2010 Larry Levis Reading Prize, Other People, (University of Chicago Press, 2005) and Mitchell Johnson (Terrence Rogers Fine Art, 2004). He was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in Poetry in 2011. He was also the 2009 recipient of the Rome Fellowship in Literature from The American Academy of Arts and Letters and has held a George Starbuck Lectureship at Boston University, as well as a Wallace Stegner Fellowship and Jones Lecturership at Stanford University. His poetry and prose have appeared recently in The Boston Globe, Modern Painters, The New Republic, Parnassus, Poetry, Poetry Northwest, Tikkun, The Yale Review and elsewhere. His monograph on the painter Joseph McNamara was published by The Seven Bridges Foundation. He has published catalog essays on such painters as Terry St. John, Kim Frohsin, Eric Aho, and Siddharth Parasnis. He won a Pushcart Prize in 2008.


Campion is the editor of the journal Literary Imagination. He is currently Assistant Professor of English at the University of Minnesota where he teaches creative writing, modern and contemporary poetry, prosody, and poetry and the visual arts.

Rhina Espaillat
Rhina P. Espaillat
Rhina P. Espaillat, visiting writer in poetry, was born in the Dominican Republic in 1932, has lived in the United States since 1939, and was educated in the public school system of New York City. She graduated from Hunter College and did graduate work at Queens College, also a branch of the City University of New York. Espaillat taught high school English in New York City for several years, and writes poetry and prose both in English and in her native Spanish. Her poems, essays, narratives and translations have appeared in numerous magazines, on many websites, and in over fifty anthologies.


Espaillat has published eleven collections of her work: Lapsing to Grace (Bennett & Kitchel, 1992); Where Horizons Go (Truman State University Press, 1998), which won the 1998 T. S. Eliot Prize; Rehearsing Absence (University of Evansville Press, 2001), which won the 2001 Richard Wilbur Award; "Mundo y Palabra/The World and the Word" (Oyster River Press, 2001), a bilingual chapbook that is part of a series titled Walking to Windward: 21 New England Poets; a chapbook in the Pudding House invitational series, titled "Rhina P. Espaillat: Greatest Hits, 1942 - 2001" (Pudding House Press, 2003); The Shadow I Dress In (David Robert Books, 2004), winner of the 2003 Stanzas Prize; a chapbook titled "The Story-teller's Hour" (Scienter Press, 2004); Playing at Stillness (Truman State University Press, 2005); a bilingual collection of poems and essays titled Agua de dos rios, published under the auspieces of the Dominican Republic’s Ministry of Culture (Editora Buho, 2006); a bilingual collection of short stories titled El olor de la memoria/The Scent of Memory (CEDIBIL, 2007); and a poetry collection titled Her Place in These Designs (Truman State University Press, 2008)

Stephen Haven
Stephen Haven
Stephen Haven, Director, has published two books of poems, Dust and Bread (Turning Point, 2008) and The Long Silence of the Mohawk Carpet Smokestacks (University of New Mexico/West End Press, 2004), and one memoir, The River Lock: One Boy’s Life along the Mohawk (Syracuse University Press, 2008). For Dust and Bread, he was named 2009 Co-Ohio Poet of the Year by the Ohio Poetry Day Association. Haven has also published a chapbook of collaborative translations from contemporary Chinese poetry, The Enemy in Defensive Positions (Poetry Miscellany Chapbooks, 2008). He is editor of The Poetry of W.D. Snodgrass: Everything Human (University of Michigan Press, 1993) and co-editor of two anthologies of contemporary poetry.


Haven's poetry and essays have appeared in The Southern Review, Parnassus, Literary Imagination, Crazyhorse, American Poetry Review, Salmagundi, Image, Western Humanities Review, The Missouri Review, and in many other journals. He has an M.F.A. in Poetry from the University of Iowa and a Ph.D. in American Civilization from New York University, where he wrote his dissertation under the direction of Harold Bloom. Haven has been a repeat fellow at Yaddo and MacDowell, twice a Fulbright Lecturer in American Literature (poetry) at universities in Beijing, and has won four individual artist grants and one residency fellowship (at the Provincetown Fine Arts Work Center) from the Ohio Arts Council.

Peter Trachtenberg
Peter Trachtenberg
Peter Trachtenberg, creative nonfiction, joined the MFA faculty in January 2011. He is the author of 7 Tattoos: A Memoir in the Flesh (Penguin, 1998) and The Book of Calamities: Five Questions About Suffering and Its Meaning (Little, Brown and Co., 2008). The latter book is the winner of the 2009 Phi Beta Kappa Emerson Award for studies that contribute significantly to interpretations of the intellectual and cultural condition of humanity. His essays, journalism, and short fiction have been published in The New Yorker, Harper’s, BOMB, A Public Space, and The New York Times Travel Magazine. He has been the recipient of a Whiting Award, a writer’s fellowship from the New York Foundation for the Arts, and the Nelson Algren Award for Short Fiction. He is a 2010-11 Fellow of the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation.

Monday, July 25, 2011

Monday, July 25, 2011

Today's Events:
All posted events are located in the Schar College of Education Ronk Lecture Hall, Ashland University in Ashland, Ohio and are free and open to the public.


1-2:30 p.m. Poetry Faculty Craft Seminar: "'What Else Is True?' Encompassing Complexity" with Ruth L. Schwartz

7-8 p.m. Visiting Writer Reading: Rhina Espaillat

About Today's Presenters:

Rhina P. Espaillat
Rhina P. Espaillat
Rhina P. Espaillat, visiting writer in poetry, was born in the Dominican Republic in 1932, has lived in the United States since 1939, and was educated in the public school system of New York City. She graduated from Hunter College and did graduate work at Queens College, also a branch of the City University of New York. Espaillat taught high school English in New York City for several years, and writes poetry and prose both in English and in her native Spanish. Her poems, essays, narratives and translations have appeared in numerous magazines, on many websites, and in over fifty anthologies.


Espaillat has published eleven collections of her work: Lapsing to Grace (Bennett & Kitchel, 1992); Where Horizons Go (Truman State University Press, 1998), which won the 1998 T. S. Eliot Prize; Rehearsing Absence (University of Evansville Press, 2001), which won the 2001 Richard Wilbur Award; "Mundo y Palabra/The World and the Word" (Oyster River Press, 2001), a bilingual chapbook that is part of a series titled Walking to Windward: 21 New England Poets; a chapbook in the Pudding House invitational series, titled "Rhina P. Espaillat: Greatest Hits, 1942 - 2001" (Pudding House Press, 2003); The Shadow I Dress In (David Robert Books, 2004), winner of the 2003 Stanzas Prize; a chapbook titled "The Story-teller's Hour" (Scienter Press, 2004); Playing at Stillness (Truman State University Press, 2005); a bilingual collection of poems and essays titled Agua de dos rios, published under the auspieces of the Dominican Republic’s Ministry of Culture (Editora Buho, 2006); a bilingual collection of short stories titled El olor de la memoria/The Scent of Memory (CEDIBIL, 2007); and a poetry collection titled Her Place in These Designs (Truman State University Press, 2008).

Ruth L. Schwartz
Ruth L. Schwartz
Ruth L. Schwartz, poetry, is the author of four books of poems, each the winner of a national award: Dear Good Naked Morning (Autumn House Press, 2005), selected by Alicia Ostriker for the 2004 Autumn House Poetry Prize; Edgewater (HarperCollins, 2002), a National Poetry Series winner chosen by Jane Hirshfield; Singular Bodies (Anhinga Press, 2001), recipient of the 2000 Anhinga Prize for Poetry; and Accordion Breathing and Dancing (University of Pittsburgh Press, 1996), winner of the 1994 Associated Writing Programs Competition. Her fifth collection of poems, Bone River, will be published by Autumn House Press in 2012. Ruth is also the author of a memoir, Death in Reverse: A Love Story (Michigan State University Press, 2004), and her creative nonfiction has appeared in the Utne Reader, The Sun, and numerous anthologies.


Recipient of over a dozen national writing awards, including fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Ohio Arts Council, and the Astraea Foundation, Ruth is also a lifelong explorer of consciousness and healing. In addition to her M.F.A. in Creative Writing, Ruth has a Ph.D. in Transpersonal Psychology, and offers workshops and retreats nationwide on the theme “The Writer As Shaman: Words as a Portal to the Soul.” Her website is http://www.thewriterasshaman.com/.

Sunday, July 24, 2011

Sunday, July 24, 2011

Today's Events:
All posted events are located in the Schar College of Education Ronk Lecture Hall, Ashland University in Ashland, Ohio and are free and open to the public.

2-3:30 p.m. Poetry and Creative Nonfiction Faculty Craft Seminar
“Writing About Art/Finding Art Within, or: How Giotto Painted My Poem”
with Jill Christman and Angie Estes

7 p.m. MFA Faculty Reading Schar 138
Robert Root, Steven Harvey, and Carmen Giménez Smith

About Today's Presenters:

Jill Christman
Jill Christman
Jill Christman’s memoir, Darkroom: A Family Exposure, won the AWP Award Series in Creative Nonfiction and was published by the University of Georgia Press in 2002. Recent essays appearing in River Teeth and Harpur Palate have been honored by Pushcart nominations and her writing has been published in Barrelhouse, Brevity, Descant, Literary Mama, Mississippi Review, Wondertime, and many other journals, magazines, and anthologies. Her work has appeared on Indiana Public Radio and in anthologies, including Writer’s Digest’s Rules of Thumb, Unbuttoned: Women tell the truth about the pains, pleasures and politics of breastfeeding, and Literature: the Human Experience. She is an Associate Professor of English at Ball State University where she teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in creative nonfiction writing in the Creative Writing program and serves as Assistant Chair of Graduate and Undergraduate Programs in the Department of English.


Angie Estes
Angie Estes
Angie Estes, poetry, is the author of four books, most recently Tryst (Oberlin College Press, 2009), which was selected as one of two finalists for the 2010 Pulitzer Prize. Her previous book, Chez Nous, also from Oberlin, appeared in 2005. Her second book, Voice-Over (Oberlin College Press, 2002), won the 2001 FIELD Poetry Prize and was also awarded the 2001 Alice Fay di Castagnola Prize from the Poetry Society of America. Her first book, The Uses of Passion (1995), was the winner of the Peregrine Smith Poetry Prize. Her poems have appeared in numerous literary magazines, including TriQuarterly, The Paris Review, Ploughshares, Boston Review, and Slate, and in the anthologies Gondola Signore Gondola: Venice in 20th Century American Poetry (Supernova Edizioni, Venezia, 2007), Contemporary Poetry in the United States: A Bilingual English-Cyrillic Edition (Russia: OGI Press, 2007), Evensong: Contemporary American Poets on Spirituality (Bottom Dog Press, 2006), The Extraordinary Tide: New Poetry by American Women (Columbia University Press, 2001), and The Geography of Home: California and the Poetry of Place (Heyday Press, 1999). Her essays have appeared in FIELD, Lyric Poetry Review, Children’s Literature, Christianity and Literature, Little Women: Norton Critical Edition, and in Every Passing Breath: Contemporary Poets Respond to the Psalms.

The recipient of many awards, including a 2010 Guggenheim Fellowship, a Pushcart Prize and the Cecil Hemley Memorial Award from the Poetry Society of America, she has received fellowships, grants, and residencies from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Woodrow Wilson Foundation, the American Academy in Rome, the California Arts Council, the MacDowell Colony, and the Ohio Arts Council. Estes received her Ph.D. and M.A. in English from the University of Oregon and was for several years Professor of American Literature and Creative Writing at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo. Most recently, she has taught creative writing at Oberlin College, at University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, and at The Ohio State University. She is also a contributing editor for the literary magazine The Journal.

Carmen Giménez Smith
Carmen Gimenez Smith
Carmen Giménez Smith has joined the MFA faculty in poetry. She is assistant professor of English at New Mexico State University, publisher for Noemi Press and Editor-in-Chief of Puerto del Sol. She is the author of the poetry collections Odalisque in Pieces (University of Arizona, 2009) and Trees Outside the Academy (Center for Literary Publishing, 2011) and the memoir Bring Down the Little Birds (University of Arizona, 2010). She also co-edited, with Kate Bernheimer, the anthology, My Mother She Killed Me, My Father He Ate Me (Penguin, 2010). Her work has most recently appeared in Ploughshares, jubilat, A Public Space and Denver Quarterly. She lives in New Mexico with her husband Evan Lavender-Smith and their two children.

Steven Harvey
Steven Harvey
Steven Harvey, creative nonfiction, is the author of Bound for Shady Grove (University of Georgia Press, 2000), a collection of personal essays about his experiences learning to sing and play the traditional music of the Appalachian Mountains where he lives. He is also the author of two other collections of personal essays, A Geometry of Lilies (University of South Carolina Press, 1993) and Lost in Translation (University of Georgia Press, 1997), and the editor of In a Dark Wood: Personal Essays by Men on Middle Age (University of Georgia Press, 1996).


Harvey is Professor of English at Young Harris College. He received his Ph.D. in literature from the University of Virginia. He has published pieces in many magazines such as Harper's, DoubleTake, The Georgia Review, The Fourth Genre, River Teeth and Creative Nonfiction, and has been anthologized in In Short, Life Studies, The Fourth Genre, Writing True: The Art and Craft of Creative Nonfiction and other collections. He is a former Governor's appointee to the board of the Georgia Humanities Council and a book reviewer for the Atlanta Journal and Constitution newspaper.

Robert Root
Robert Root
Robert Root, creative nonfiction, is the author of Recovering Ruth: A Biographer’s Tale (University of Nebraska Press, 2002), and Following Isabella: Travels in Colorado Then and Now (University of Oklahoma Press, 2009) as well as The Nonfictionist’s Guide: On Reading and Writing Creative Nonfiction (Rowman & Littlefield, 2007) and E. B. White: The Emergence of an Essayist (University of Iowa Press, 1998). He is the editor of Landscapes With Figures: The Nonfiction of Place (Nebraska, 2007), a book of essays of place and commentaries by authors, and the co-editor of the anthology The Fourth Genre: Contemporary Writers of/on Creative Nonfiction (Longman, 2009), now in its sixth edition. He is also the author or editor of nine other books and is the Interview/Roundtable editor for the journal Fourth Genre: Explorations in Nonfiction. A collection of his essays, Postscripts: Retrospections on Time and Place (Nebraska) will be published in 2012.


Root has taught at Central Michigan University, the Lighthouse Writers Workshop in Denver, and the Loft Writers Workshop in Minneapolis. His article “Collage, Montage, Mosaic, Vignette, Episode, Segment,” from The Fourth Genre, is often assigned in creative nonfiction courses across the country. An essay on writing and teaching, “A Double Life,” published in Writing on the Edge, won the 2007 Donald Murray Award for Best Essay on Writing and/or Teaching.

His essays have been published in many literary journals: “Knowing Where You’ve Been,” in Ascent, was named a Notable Essay in The Best American Essays 2004; “The Pattern of Life Indelible,” in Ecotone, was listed in 2007; “Postscript to a Postscript to ‘The Ring of Time’,” in The Pinch was listed in 2010, nominated for a Pushcart Prize, and given the Council of Wisconsin Writers Short Nonfiction Award. He has been an Artist-in-Residence at Acadia National Park, Rocky Mountain National Park, and Isle Royale National Park. He lives in Waukesha, Wisconsin. His websites are http://www.rootwriting.com/ and www.chsbs.cmich.edu/Robert_Root.

Monday, July 18, 2011

Summer Residency 2011 Week One Schedule of Events

Looking for something to do next week during the afternoon or evening?  Come hear excellent writers present craft seminars and readings at Ashland University's MFA summer writer series!  All craft seminars and readings are free and open to the public.  Unless noted, events will be held in the Schar College of Education Ronk Lecture Hall at Ashland University in Ashland, Ohio. 

Here's the schedule for week one:

Sunday, July 24

2-3:30 p.m. Craft Seminar: “Writing About Art/Finding Art Within, or: How Giotto Painted My Poem” with Jill Christman and Angie Estes

7 p.m. Faculty Reading: Robert Root, Steven Harvey, and Carmen Giménez Smith



Monday, July 25
1-2:30 p.m. Craft Seminar: “’What Else Is True?’ Encompassing Complexity” with Ruth L. Schwartz

7-8 p.m. Visiting Writer Reading: Rhina Espaillat



Tuesday, July 26
1-2:30 p.m. Craft Seminar: “Dancing in a Box” with Rhina Espaillat

7 p.m. Faculty Reading: Stephen Haven, Peter Trachtenberg, and Peter Campion



Wednesday, July 27
7 p.m. Faculty Reading: Bob Cowser, Ruth L. Schwartz, and Jill Christman



Thursday, July 28
1-2:30 p.m. Craft Seminar: “Poetry and Memorability” with Mark Irwin and Peter Campion

7 p.m. Visiting Writer Reading: Tom French



Friday, July 29
1-2:30 p.m. Craft Seminar: Tom French

7 p.m. Faculty Reading: Deborah Fleming and Joe Mackall



Saturday, July 30
10 a.m.-12 p.m. Panel on “The Life of Literature: Before and After Publishing” with Joe Mackall, Deb Fleming, Steve Haven, and Tom Larson

Meet the Team

We're very pleased to introduce our spring 2018 Ashland MFA Faculty. We hope you're as excited about these names as we ar...