Wednesday, December 14, 2011

Calls for Submissions - December 2011

NewPages LitPak!

Dozens of calls for submissions and contest announcements are available in the most recent LitPak, put out by NewPages.  Visit http://www.newpages.com/classifieds/LitPak to view the PDFs of these fliers.




The Coffin Factory Call for Submissions and Poetry Contest


Greetings from the editors of The Coffin Factory, a new literary magazine for people who love books. We publish fiction, essay, and art three times a year because we believe that quality literature and art are essential for the existence of an intelligent and culturally engaged society.

Our first issue is now available in Barnes & Noble and independent bookstores nationwide, and features work by Joyce Carol Oates, Milan Kundera, Roberto Bolaño, José Saramago, and Rabindranath Tagore, in addition to interviews with New Directions Publishing and Justin Taylor.

In each issue we feature at least one Market Fresh Selection, which is a section devoted to writers who have not been published in any major magazines or journals, and do not have an agent. We pay professional rates to all of our writers. Submission guidelines can be found on our website at thecoffinfactory.com.

We are also having a Poetry Contest.  Submissions are open now through December 15.  Please visit our website for guidelines.

For more information, or to purchase your copy of the magazine directly from our website, please visit us at thecoffinfactory.com. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for updates on events, book reviews, and contemporary reading culture. 



Meridian Call for Submissions

MERIDIAN is accepting online entries for its twelfth annual Editors’ Prize Contests in fiction and poetry. Genre winners receive a $1,000 prize and publication; all entries receive a one-year electronic subscription. Entry fee: $8.00.  Deadline: midnight, Dec. 30, 2011.

Please note a few significant changes in our 2012 contest:
1) Our entry fee is now only $8
2) Entrants receive an electronic version of the journal (.pdf or ePub) rather than a print subscription
3) We are only allowing two submissions per genre per entrant

We believe this new contest model is better for you, and better for us. Rather than having you pay substantial entry fees to cover the cost of a print subscription (and mailing fees), we’re trying a lower $8 entry fee and will e-mail you electronic versions of the January and May 2012 issues. Fewer trees, less cost … and we’ll still have print-on-demand versions of Meridian available at an inexpensive rate for those readers who want something tangible.

We expect to announce winners toward the end of March 2012.

All submissions will be considered for publication in Meridian.
Fiction writers may submit one story of 10,000 words or fewer. Poets may submit up to 4 poems totaling 10 pages or fewer.

For full eligibility rules and submission guidelines see http://readmeridian.org/?page_id=47

Kweli Journal Call for Submissions

Kweli Journal, an online literary journal that celebrates the shared cultural experience of people of color, is currently seeking literature of occupation for its January 2012 social justice issue. The Occupy Movement is a national movement of men and women from all races, backgrounds, and religions with the shared goal of ending corporate greed from the wealthiest 1%. Kweli Journal invites submissions of short stories, poetry, and essays that represent the day to day realities and frustrations of the poor working class and middle class living on the edge. Let your words and experiences be part of the global movement against the oppression of the 99%.

Recent issues of Kweli have featured the work of Jennine Capo Crucet and Amaud Jamaul Johnson. Upcoming issues of the journal will feature Camille Dungy, Aaron Michael Morales and Neela Vaswani.

For fiction, we primarily look for short stories or self-contained novel excerpts. Prose should be double-spaced. Submit one prose piece at a time. For nonfiction, we look for personal essays or self-contained memoir excerpts. Prose should be double-spaced. Submit one prose piece at a time.For poetry, we allow a submission of three poems at a time. Submissions should be single spaced and set as you want it to appear on the printed page.

Our next reading period is November 19, 2011 to January 7, 2012. Submit your work to: http://kwelijournal.submishmash.com/. Payment is upon publication.



Prism International Contests

PRISM's 2011/2012 contest deadlines are approaching, so stop procrastinating and get your entries in!!

The Short Fiction Contest has a deadline of January 27, 2012. The winning story will receive $2000, as well as publication payment for our poetry and fiction contest issue. Three runner-up prizes of $200 dollars are also conferred. This year's judge is Jessica Grant, an award-winning fiction writer, a member of Newfoundland’s Burning Rock Collective (members include Michael Winter and Lisa Moore), and the author of Making Light of Tragedy and Come, Thou Tortoise.

The Poetry Contest also has a January 27, 2012 deadline. Each entry can be up to three poems. A $1000 grand prize is awarded for the best poem and the winner receives publication and payment in our poetry and fiction contest issue. $300 and $200 are awarded to runners-up. This year's poetry judge is Jen Currin, author of three books of poetry: The Sleep of Four Cites (Anvil Press, 2005); Hagiography (Coach House, 2008); and The Inquisition Yours (Coach House, 2010), which is shortlisted for the 2011 Dorothy Livesay Poetry Prize, the Lambda Literary Award in Poetry, and the Audre Lorde Poetry Award.

Entry fees for all contests are $28, and additional entries can be added for $7 each. Every participant receives a one-year subscription to PRISM international. Works of translation are eligible.

Contest entries must be sent to PRISM through snail mail, accompanied by an entry form and cheque or receipt of credit card payment. For entry forms and the option to pay fees by credit card, please visit PRISM's contest page.
Entries can be sent to:

PRISM international
Creative Writing Program
The University of British Columbia
BUCH E462-1866 Main Mall
Vancouver, BC
V6T 1Z1
CANADA



CutBank Contests Call for Submissions

CutBank is proud to announce our call for submissions to our annual Montana Prize in Fiction, Montana Prize in Creative Non-Fiction, and the Patricia Goedicke Prize in Poetry!

Submissions have already begun, but the contests run through Feb 29, 2012. Winners receive $500 and publication in CutBank 77. All submissions will be considered for publication in CutBank. The contests' $17 entry fee includes a one-year, two-issue subscription to CutBank, beginning with the prize issue, CutBank 77.

Please send only your best work. With all three of these awards, we are seeking to highlight work that showcases an authentic voice, a boldness of form, and a rejection of functional fixedness. For more information, guidelines, and to apply, click here.

Our judges this year are the following:

Montana Prize in Fiction: Benjamin Percy
Montana Prize in Creative Non-Fiction: Eula Biss
Patricia Goedicke Prize in Poetry: Bhanu Kapil



Cab Call for Submissions

The new literary journal Cab is seeking submissions of literary fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, and cross-genre work. Writers are paid for their work. Submission guidelines at http://www.conversationsacrossborders.org/

Cab is also on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Conversations-Across-Borders/200770549966997. Cab is a philanthropic literary journal. The proceeds of sales go to support schools and literacy programs around the world.



Ginosko Literary Journal Call for Submissions

Accepting short fiction & poetry, creative nonfiction, interviews, social justice concerns, spiritual insights for GINOSKO LITERARY JOURNAL.

Editorial lead time 1-2 months; accept simultaneous submissions & reprints; length flexible, accept excerpts. Receives postal submissions & email—prefer email submissions as attachments in Microsoft Works Word Processor, Rich Text Format or Word. Copyright reverts to author. Read year around.

Publishing as semiannual ezine. Check downloadable issues on website for tone & style: http://www.ginoskoliteraryjournal.com/.

Thursday, December 1, 2011

New Faculty for Spring 2012

The Ashland University MFA Program extends a warm welcome to Thomas Larson and Bonnie J. Rough, joining the program as honored visiting graduate faculty this spring.

Thomas Larson is the author of The Saddest Music Ever Written: The Story of Samuel Barber's "Adagio for Strings" and The Memoir and the Memoirist: Reading and Writing Personal Narrative, Ohio University Press / Swallow Press, now in its third printing. He teaches, lectures, and holds workshops on memoir writing throughout the United States.

Larson writes personal essays, memoir, feature articles, book reviews, and literary criticism. For the last twelve years, he has been a contributing writer for the weekly San Diego Reader where he specializes in investigative journalism, narrative nonfiction, and profiles.

His writing has appeared in numerous reviews and journals, among them Tampa Review, The Gettysburg Review, Southwest Review, Antioch Review, Fourth Genre, Amazon.com/Shorts, the Anchor Essay Annual: The Best of 1997, Contrary Magazine online where he does quarterly book reviews, and New Letters where his memoir, "Mrs. Wright’s Bookshop," won the journal’s Reader’s Award for the Essay in 2008.


Bonnie J. Rough is the author of the memoir Carrier: Untangling the Danger in My DNA, which won a 2011 Minnesota Book Award. Her writing has appeared in anthologies such as The Best American Science and Nature Writing and The Best Creative Nonfiction, and periodicals including The New York Times, Huffington Post, The Sun, The Iowa Review, Defunct, and Brevity. Rough, who has her MFA from the University of Iowa, has taught at The Loft Literary Center and is a prose editor for Versal.

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Calls for Submissions, November 2011

Each month, the Ashland University low-residency MFA program compiles a list of calls for submissions and upcoming contests, which is then distributed through the program's electronic newsletter.  To have your contest or journal included, email mfa@ashland.edu with a brief description and a link to the contest guidelines.



Submissions are now open for LUMINA's 2012 Issue, and for our Poetry Contest!

We are seeking submissions of Fiction, Nonfiction, and Poetry for this year’s issue of LUMINA. The Poetry Contest will be judged by acclaimed poet Carolyn Forché and will award a $500 First Place prize.

Deadline for all submissions is November 15, 2011.

http://www.slclumina.wordpress.com/



Mason’s Road Call for Submissions

The submission period for Mason’s Road literary journal issue 4 is now open. We’re seeking engaging fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction, drama (stage or screen), art, craft essays, and audio drama. Each issue is devoted to an element of craft, and the theme for issue 4 is Image.

Mason’s Road’s first issue was launched in July 2010 as an e-publication with a strong reach into the literary community. It’s a collaborative effort among all graduate students at Fairfield University’s low-residency Creative Writing program, founded in 2008 on inspirational Enders Island off the coast of Mystic, Connecticut. Renowned poet Ravi Shankar is this semester’s faculty advisor. Our submission manager will close on November 15th. Please see our complete submission guidelines at:

http://www.masonsroad.com/about-2/submission-guidelines/

In the meantime, enjoy our Arc-themed issue 3. We’re excited about it.

http://www.masonsroad.com/



PRISM Contests

PRISM's 2011/2012 contests are now open, so getcher entries in!!

Entry fees for all contests are $28, and additional entries can be added for $7 each. Every participant receives a one-year subscription to PRISM international. Works of translation are eligible.

The Nonfiction Contest is first up, with a deadline of November 30, 2011. The grand prize is $1500, and this contest is being judged by Amber Dawn, a writer, filmmaker and performance artist based in Vancouver. She is the author of the novel Sub Rosa (Arsenal Pulp Press, 2010), and editor of the Lambda Award-nominated Fist of the Spider Woman (Arsenal Pulp Press, 2008).

The Poetry Contest also has a January 30, 2012 deadline. Each entry can be up to three poems. A $1000 grand prize is awarded for the best poem and the winner receives publication and payment in our poetry and fiction contest issue. $300 and $200 are awarded to runners-up. This year's poetry judge is Jen Currin, author of three books of poetry: The Sleep of Four Cites (Anvil Press, 2005); Hagiography (Coach House, 2008); and The Inquisition Yours (Coach House, 2010), which is shortlisted for the 2011 Dorothy Livesay Poetry Prize, the Lambda Literary Award in Poetry, and the Audre Lorde Poetry Award.

Contest entries must be sent to PRISM through snail mail, accompanied by an entry form and cheque or receipt of credit card payment. For entry forms and the option to pay fees by credit card, please visit PRISM's contest page.

Entries can be sent to:

PRISM international
Creative Writing Program
The University of British Columbia
BUCH E462-1866 Main Mall
Vancouver, BC
V6T 1Z1
CANADA



The Brooklyn Review Call for Submissions

The Brooklyn Review is published annually by Brooklyn College of the City University of New York. Begun almost 30 years ago by Allen Ginsberg, The Brooklyn Review has been overseen throughout its history by esteemed writers such as L.S. Asekoff, Amy Hempel, Josh Henkin, and Jonathan Baumbach. We’ve been honored to publish work by Sapphire, Wayne Koestenbaum, Young Jean Lee, T Cooper, Ann Lauterbach, and David Levinson. While traditionally having published only poetry, short fiction, plays, and visual art, The Brooklyn Review is expanding to include multimedia works as well as interviews with working writers and artists.

The editors invite submissions of poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, drama, photography, artwork, short films, and multimedia pieces from September 1st until December 15th.

Manuscripts, films, and multimedia work must be submitted via mail and include a SASE (self-addressed, stamped envelope) and a cover letter (including name, address, email address, phone number, and titles of submitted work(s)). To ensure a fair selection process, we ask that writers do not include their names or pen names on manuscripts.

Please address your submission to the relevant editor (see the About page at www.brooklynreview.org for updated staff information), and send to the following address:

The Brooklyn Review
English Department
Brooklyn College
2900 Bedford Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11210

Visit http://www.brooklynreview.org/ for more information.



Snail Mail Review Call for Submissions

Snail Mail Review is an up-and-coming literary journal. The editors are now seeking submissions for the third issue. Submissions are open now until December 31, 2011. We would love to receive a submission from you. We accept all genres of poetry and short fiction. Attached is a flier with all the specific submission guidelines. There is No Pay for accepted submissions. Contributors will receive a complimentary copy as payment. No online submissions are accepted. Online submissions are only accepted from over seas & Canada. Feel free to redistribute this flier to other writers as you see fit. If you are interested in submitting, pleasesend 3-5 poems of no more than 35 lines and/or 1-7 pages of fiction to:

Snail Mail Review
c/o Kris Price
3000 Coffee Rd
Chateau Apt #B6
Modesto, CA 95355

No online submissions.

Please feel free to contact us if you have any further questions at snailmailreview@gmail.com.



Star Mill Review Call for Submissions

The Star Mill Review, Penn State University’s new online literary journal, is accepting submissions October 3-December 31, 2011.

VISIT US AT: http://www.starmillreview.com/

The Star Mill Review publishes short fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction, and visual art. Edited by students in the MFA program in creative writing and the MFA program in visual arts at The Pennsylvania State University, The Star Mill Review favors no particular niche or school in its search for thought-provoking and exquisitely-crafted work. We're looking for poems, stories, essays, and visual art that incite an enduring emotional response. We look forward to seeing your best work.



Merton Institute for Contemplative Living Poetry of the Sacred Contest

The Annual Poetry of the Sacred contest is now accepting submissions. The guidelines follow:

First Prize, $500; Three Honorable Mention Prizes, $100 each.

Winning Poems will be published in The Merton Seasonal, a publication of scholarly articles about noted spiritual leader Thomas Merton and will be posted on the Merton Institute web site: http://www.mertoninstitute.org/.

Only ONE unpublished poem type written in English may be submitted per poet.

Please limit the poem to no more than 100 lines.

Type your name, address, phone numberemail address, and the title of your poem on a cover page. Attach (1) one copy of your titled poem to the cover page.

Submit your poem on a page with no identifying information. All identifying information should be on your cover page. Include a submission fee of $15.00 with the poem.

Poems will not be accepted via email. The poem must be sent via through the postal service.
Deadline to submit poems is January 31, 2012.

Submit poem to: Merton Institute, 415 West Muhammad Ali Blvd., Louisville, KY 40202. Include the $15 submission fee payable to The Merton Institute.

No poems will be returned.

Poems will be judged on literary excellence, spiritual tenor, and human authenticity.

Winners will be announced by April 1, 2012. Please visit the Institute website for contest results.



The Pinch Literary Awards in Fiction and Poetry 2012

Sponsored by the Hohenberg Foundation

Fiction First Prize: $1,500.00. Judged by Justin Torres.

Poetry First Prize: $1,000.00. Judged by Nicky Beer.

ENTRY PERIOD:

December 15th – March 1. Entries not postmarked within the reading period will be discarded unread.

PUBLICATION:

All entries are considered for publication. First, second, and third place winners will be selected from each category. The first place fiction winner, along with all three poetry winners, will be published in the Spring issue following announcement. Second and third place winners in fiction will be given high-priority consideration for publication, but because of space, cannot be guaranteed. Due to the high volume of submissions, any prize winners will be ineligible for contest participation for three years.

ENCLOSE THE FOLLOWING WITH EACH ENTRY:

1. $20 for the first entry; $10 for each subsequent entry. Fiction entries should not exceed 5,000 words. An “entry” in the poetry contest is 1-3 poems, and please include $10 for each group of three after the initial entry. Poems need not be related. Please make checks payable to The University of Memphis Foundation. No cash, please. The $20 entry fee also includes one issue of The Pinch. Additional postage charge for international subscriptions.

2. A cover sheet with the author’s contact information: name, address, phone number, and email address. The author’s contact information should notappear on the manuscript itself. Entries that do not adhere to this policy will be discarded unread. Please notify us if your address or email changes.

3. An optional self-addressed stamped postcard for notification of receipt of entry and entry number.

SUBMIT ENTRIES ONLINE AT:

http://thepinch.submishmash.com/submit



CURA: Literary Magazine for Art and Action Call for Submissions

Fordham University's national literary magazine, CURA: A Literary Magazine of Art and Action is now accepting submissions. Featuring creative writing, visual art, new media and video in response to current news, we seek to enable an artistic process that is rigorously engaged with the world at the present moment.  Our aim is to seek to integrate literary art publishing with social justice.  We have featured work by Robert Bly, Evie Shockley, Lia Purpura, and Rigoberto Gonzalez.

http://www.curamag.com/



Noctua Review Call for Submissions

The staff of Noctua Review, the graduate literary journal of Southern Connecticut State University, is seeking submissions of fiction and poetry for its 2012 issue.

In regards to fiction submissions, we are looking for individual pieces (doc, txt, rtf) of up to 3,000 words or multiple pieces totaling no more than 3,000 words. 

For poetry, we accept up to five poems uploaded in a single document (doc, txt, rtf). 

We ask that submitters not include any identifying or contact information on the submissions themselves, rather within their cover letter along with a brief bio.  We only accept electronic submissions via our online submissions manager at http://www.noctuareview.submishmash.com/.

Our complete guidelines are available on our website http://www.noctuareview.wordpress.com/.



Phoebe Call for Submissions

Phoebe is now accepting submissions for its annual contests. The winners and runners-up will be published in our first-ever online issue next year. Submit online and send us the best you’ve got! All entries should include a cover letter with the submission’s title and author’s contact information (name, mailing address, telephone number, and email address). Your name and contact information must not appear anywhere else on the manuscript. You may submit multiple entries, but the entry fee must be paid for each new submission.  For more information, visit http://www.phoebejournal.com/?p=1522.



Ginosko Review Call for Submissions

Accepting short fiction & poetry, creative nonfiction, interviews, social justice concerns, spiritual insights for GINOSKO LITERARY JOURNAL.

Editorial lead time 1-2 months; accept simultaneous submissions & reprints; length flexible, accept excerpts. Receives postal submissions & email—prefer email submissions as attachments in Microsoft Works Word Processor (.wps), Rich Text Format (.rtf) or Word (.doc). Copyright reverts to author. Read year around.

Publishing as semiannual ezine. Check downloadable issues on website for tone & style: http://www.ginoskoliteraryjournal.com/ Use latest version of Adobe Reader. Downloads free, accept donations.

ezine circulation  7000+. Website traffic 500-750 hits/month.

Also looking for books, art, music to post on website, and links to exchange.

Ginosko Short Fiction Contest, deadline May 1st, $12 entry fee, $500 prize.

Ginosko (ghin-océ-koe)
To perceive, understand, realize, come to know; knowledge that has an inception, a progress, an attainment. The recognition of truth by experience.

Member CLMP.

Ginosko Literary Journal
Robert Paul Cesaretti, Editor
PO Box 246
Fairfax, CA 94978
USA



Floodwall Magazine Call for Submissions

Floodwall Magazine, a literary journal produced by the graduate students of the University of North Dakota, is pleased to announce its first call for submissions. We are seeking fiction and poetry for both our online and print issues that will debut this spring. We accept fiction and poetry written in any form and across any genre (up to 6,000 words in the fiction category) as long as they address what it means to be human, challenging our expectations and moving us to a place we’ve yet to experience.


Please send any work to floodwallmagazine@gmail.com in an attachment (.doc, .docx, or .rtf format) with the category you are submitting to in the subject line along with a brief bio in the body of the e-mail. We look forward to hearing the voices of both emerging and established writers as well as encountering the work that makes us pause.

For more information please visit us at http://und.edu/orgs/floodwall/homepage.cfm



Sans Serif Literary Journal

We are a student-run publication at the University of Mary Washington seeking to showcase the truth through reality-based artistic forms. Oftentimes, the truth is stranger than fiction and is the only thing you can ever fully rely on.  We are looking for quality, original and exciting works of non-fictional prose, interviews (video or text), and photography to add to our journal.
For more information and details, please visit our website: http://sansserifliteraryjournal.wordpress.com%20or/ submit directly to sansserifliteraryjournal@gmail.com.

Monday, October 3, 2011

Best American Essays 2011 Faculty Notables

Several of the Ashland University MFA Program's faculty members appear in the Notables section of the Best American Essays 2011 anthology.  Congratulations to Steven Harvey ("Blood Mountain," Ascent, March 9), Robert Root ("Time and Tide," Ascent, August 1), and Kathryn Winograd ("Bathing," Fourth Genre, Spring).

Notables are selected by the series editor, Robert Atwan.

For the complete list of Notables and the Table of Contents for this year's anthology, visit Houghton-Mifflin.

Thursday, September 15, 2011

Upcoming Ashland MFA Info Sessions

Please join us for one of our upcoming info sessions to learn more about the program and to meet some of the faculty. If you are interested in one of these sessions, please R.S.V.P. to Sarah Wells no later than one week prior to the event. Light refreshments will be served.


Ashland University, Ashland, Ohio

Tuesday, October 4, 2011, 7-9 p.m.
Dauch College of Business and Economics, Room 105


Monday, November 14, 2011, 7-9 p.m.  
Dauch College of Business and Economics, Room 104

 
Denver, Colorado

Wednesday, October 12, 2011, 7-9 p.m.
Location TBA


Oakland, California

Wednesday, October 19, 2011, 7-9 p.m.

Crepevine, 5600 College Ave., Oakland, CA, 94618

Tuesday, August 30, 2011

Visiting Writers for 2012

The Ashland University MFA Program is proud to announce its visiting writer lineup for summer 2012.  The following visiting writers will be on the Ashland University campus during the MFA program's residency July 28 through August 10, 2012.

Eula Biss

Eula Biss is the author of The Balloonists and Notes from No Man’s Land.  Her work has recently been recognized by a National Book Critics Circle Award, a Howard Foundation Fellowship, and a Guggenheim Fellowship.  She holds an MFA in nonfiction writing from the University of Iowa and teaches nonfiction writing at Northwestern University.  Her essays have recently appeared in The Best American Nonrequired Reading, The Best Creative Nonfiction, The Believer, Gulf Coast, and Harper’s.


Andre Dubus III
Andre Dubus III
Andre Dubus III grew up in mill towns on the Merrimack River along the Massachusetts-New Hampshire border. He began writing fiction at age 22 just a few months after graduating from the University of Texas at Austin with a Bachelor’s Degree in Sociology. Because he prefers to write in the morning, going from “the dream world to the dream world”, as the Irish writer Edna O'Brien puts it, he took mainly night jobs: bartender, office cleaner, halfway house counselor, and for six months worked as an assistant to a private investigator/bounty hunter. Over the years he's also worked as a self-employed carpenter and college writing teacher.
Andre Dubus III is the author of a collection of short fiction, The Cage Keeper and Other Stories, and the novels Bluesman, House of Sand and Fog and The Garden of Last Days, a New York Times bestseller. His memoir, Townie, was published in February 2011 with W.W. Norton & Co. His work has been included in The Best American Essays of 1994, The Best Spiritual Writing of 1999, and The Best of Hope Magazine. He has been awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship, The National Magazine Award for fiction, The Pushcart Prize, and was a Finalist for the Rome Prize Fellowship from the Academy of Arts and Letters.
An Academy Award-nominated motion picture and published in twenty languages, his novel House of Sand and Fog was a fiction finalist for the National Book Award, the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, Booksense Book of the Year, and was an Oprah Book Club Selection and #1 New York Times bestseller. A member of PEN American Center, Andre Dubus III has served as a panelist for The National Book Foundation, The National Endowment for the Arts, and has taught writing at Harvard University, Tufts University, Emerson College, and the University of Massachusetts Lowell where he is a full-time faculty member. He is married to performer Fontaine Dollas Dubus. They live in Massachusetts with their three children.

Garrett Hongo
Garrett Hongo
Garrett Hongo was born in Volcano, Hawai`i and grew up on the North Shore of O`ahu and in Los Angeles.  He was educated at Pomona College, the University of Michigan, and UC Irvine, where he received an M.F.A.  His work includes three books of poetry, three anthologies, and Volcano: A Memoir of Hawai`i.  He is the editor of The Open Boat: Poems from Asian America (Anchor) and Under Western Eyes: Personal Essays from Asian America (Anchor).  Poems and essays of his have appeared in The New York Times Magazine, Ploughshares, Kenyon Review, Georgia Review, APR, Honolulu Weekly, Amerasia Journal, Virginia Quarterly Review, Raritan, and the LA Times.  Among his honors are the Guggenheim Fellowship, two NEA grants, and the Lamont Poetry Prize from the Academy of American Poets. His latest book of poetry, Coral Road, was published by Knopf in Fall 2011.  He is presently at work on a book of non-fiction entitled The Perfect Sound: An Autobiography in Stereo.  He teaches at the University of Oregon, where he is Distinguished Professor of Arts and Sciences.

Laura Kasischke
Laura Kasischke
Laura Kasischke has published eight collections of poetry (most recently Space, in Chains, Copper Canyon Press) and eight novels, including two which have been made into feature length films.  She has been the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship as well as two grants from the National Endowment for the Arts.  She teaches in the MFA Program at the University of Michigan, and lives with her family in Chelsea, Michigan.

Tuesday, August 9, 2011

Summer Residency Recap

In case you missed out on this year's MFA residency at Ashland University, several of the readings and craft seminars were recorded.  Visit the links below to hear presentations by MFA faculty and visiting writers.

Visiting Writer Presentations, including readings and craft seminars by Thomas French, Kathleen Norris, David Wojahn, Todd Boss, Thomas Larson, and Michael Steinberg

Faculty Presentations, including readings and craft seminars by Peter Campion, Jill Christman, Bob Cowser, Angie Estes, Deborah Fleming, Carmen Gimenez Smith, Steven Harvey, Stephen Haven, Mark Irwin, Joe Mackall, Leila Philip, Robert Root, Ruth L. Schwartz, Peter Trachtenberg, and Kathryn Winograd

Congratulations are due to the nineteen graduating students of the Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing Program at Ashland University!  The following students defended thesis manuscripts at the summer residency July 24-August 5.

Amelia Berg, Creative Nonfiction - "Para los Niños"
Marilyn Bousquin, Creative Nonfiction - "Searching for Salt: A Memoir"
Varale Goodman, Creative Nonfiction - "Death and Other Transformations"
Joan Hanna, Poetry - "Phoenix"
Detrick Hughes, Poetry - "Sugar-Tooth Confession"
Kimberlee Jackson, Poetry - "Walking Fire"
Erin Joyce, Creative Nonfiction - "The Song of Eirinn"
Jon Kerstetter, Creative Nonfiction - "I Am Soldier, I Am Doctor"
Emily Lees, Creative Nonfiction - "My Hands Are Your Hands"
Nancy Leinbach, Creative Nonfiction - "GETTING TWO YEARS TWICE: Circa La Mia Vita"
Dave MacWilliams, Creative Nonfiction - "Acts of Grace: A Memoir"
Erica Meuser, Poetry - "In America's Wake: Mother and Sons"
Kerry Noble, Poetry - "Stages"
Rachel Peterson, Poetry - "Burn"
Nicole Robinson, Poetry - "Wingspan"
Ginny Taylor, Creative Nonfiction - "The Undrowning"
Laurel Thome, Poetry - "FORCE = MASS X ACCELERATION"
Marci Vogel, Poetry - "Millennial Triptych"
David Wright, Poetry - "Several Heads: A Triptych"

Friday, August 5, 2011

Friday, August 5, 2011

Today's Events:

All posted events are located in the Schar College of Education Ronk Lecture Hall, Ashland University in Ashland, Ohio and are free and open to the public.


1 p.m. - Craft Seminar with David Wojahn

About the Presenter:

David Wojahn

David Wojahn
David Wojahn, visiting writer in poetry, was born in St. Paul, Minnesota, in 1953, and educated at the University of Minnesota and the University of Arizona. His first collection, Icehouse Lights, was chosen by Richard Hugo as a winner of the Yale Series of Younger Poets prize, and published in 1982. The collection was also the winner of the Poetry Society of America’s William Carlos Williams Book Award. His second collection, Glassworks, was published by the University of Pittsburgh Press in 1987, and was awarded the Society of Midland Authors’ Award for best volume of poetry to be published during that year. Pittsburgh is also the publisher of four of his subsequent books, Mystery Train (1990), Late Empire (1994), The Falling Hour (1997) and Spirit Cabinet (2002). Interrogation Palace: New and Selected Poems 1982-2004, published by Pittsburgh in 2006, was one of three finalists for the Pulitzer Prize and winner of the O. B. Hardison Award from the Folger Shakespeare Library. His newest collection, World Tree, was published by Pittsburgh in February 2011.


He is also the author of a collection of essays on contemporary poetry, Strange Good Fortune (University of Arkansas Press, 2001), and editor (with Jack Myers) of A Profile of 20th Century American Poetry (Southern Illinois University Press, 1991), and two posthumous collections of Lynda Hull’s poetry, The Only World (HarperCollins, 1995) and Collected Poems (Graywolf, 2006). He has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, the Illinois and Indiana Councils for the Arts, and in 1987-88 was the Amy Lowell Traveling Poetry Scholar. He has taught at a number of institutions, among them Indiana University, the University of Chicago, the University of Houston, the University of Alabama, and the University of New Orleans. He is presently Professor of English at Virginia Commonwealth University, and is also a member of the program faculty of the MFA in Writing Program of Vermont College of Fine Arts.

Thursday, August 4, 2011

Thursday, August 4, 2011

Today's Events:

All posted events are located in the Schar College of Education Ronk Lecture Hall, Ashland University in Ashland, Ohio and are free and open to the public.


1 p.m. Craft Seminar: "The Facts of the Matter" with Sonya Huber and Peter Trachtenberg

7 p.m. Reading by David Wojahn

About the Presenters:

Sonya Huber
Sonya Huber
Sonya Huber is the author of two books of creative nonfiction, Cover Me: A Health Insurance Memoir (University of Nebraska Press, 2010), finalist for the 2010 Grub Street National Book Prize in Nonfiction, and Opa Nobody (University of Nebraska Press, 2008), shortlisted for the Saroyan Prize. She has also written a textbook, The Backwards Research Guide for Writers: Using Your Life for Reflection, Connection, and Inspiration (Equinox Publishing, forthcoming). Her work has been published in literary journals and magazines including Fourth Genre, Passages North, Hotel Amerika, Crab Orchard Review, The Chronicle of Higher Education, and the Washington Post Magazine, in other journals and in many anthologies. She teaches in the Department of Writing and Linguistics at Georgia Southern University

Peter Trachtenberg

Peter Trachtenberg

Peter Trachtenberg, creative nonfiction, joined the MFA faculty in January 2011. He is the author of 7 Tattoos: A Memoir in the Flesh (Penguin, 1998) and The Book of Calamities: Five Questions About Suffering and Its Meaning (Little, Brown and Co., 2008). The latter book is the winner of the 2009 Phi Beta Kappa Emerson Award for studies that contribute significantly to interpretations of the intellectual and cultural condition of humanity. His essays, journalism, and short fiction have been published in The New Yorker, Harper’s, BOMB, A Public Space, and The New York Times Travel Magazine. He has been the recipient of a Whiting Award, a writer’s fellowship from the New York Foundation for the Arts, and the Nelson Algren Award for Short Fiction. He is a 2010-11 Fellow of the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation.
David Wojahn

David Wojahn
David Wojahn, visiting writer in poetry, was born in St. Paul, Minnesota, in 1953, and educated at the University of Minnesota and the University of Arizona. His first collection, Icehouse Lights, was chosen by Richard Hugo as a winner of the Yale Series of Younger Poets prize, and published in 1982. The collection was also the winner of the Poetry Society of America’s William Carlos Williams Book Award. His second collection, Glassworks, was published by the University of Pittsburgh Press in 1987, and was awarded the Society of Midland Authors’ Award for best volume of poetry to be published during that year. Pittsburgh is also the publisher of four of his subsequent books, Mystery Train (1990), Late Empire (1994), The Falling Hour (1997) and Spirit Cabinet (2002). Interrogation Palace: New and Selected Poems 1982-2004, published by Pittsburgh in 2006, was one of three finalists for the Pulitzer Prize and winner of the O. B. Hardison Award from the Folger Shakespeare Library. His newest collection, World Tree, was published by Pittsburgh in February 2011.


He is also the author of a collection of essays on contemporary poetry, Strange Good Fortune (University of Arkansas Press, 2001), and editor (with Jack Myers) of A Profile of 20th Century American Poetry (Southern Illinois University Press, 1991), and two posthumous collections of Lynda Hull’s poetry, The Only World (HarperCollins, 1995) and Collected Poems (Graywolf, 2006). He has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, the Illinois and Indiana Councils for the Arts, and in 1987-88 was the Amy Lowell Traveling Poetry Scholar. He has taught at a number of institutions, among them Indiana University, the University of Chicago, the University of Houston, the University of Alabama, and the University of New Orleans. He is presently Professor of English at Virginia Commonwealth University, and is also a member of the program faculty of the MFA in Writing Program of Vermont College of Fine Arts.


Wednesday, August 3, 2011

Wednesday, August 3, 2011

Today's Events:

All posted events are located in the Schar College of Education Ronk Lecture Hall, Ashland University in Ashland, Ohio and are free and open to the public.


7 p.m. - Reading by Todd Boss, Tom Larson, and Michael Steinberg

About the Presenters:

Todd Boss

Todd Boss
Todd Boss, visiting editor in poetry, grew up on an 80-acre cattle farm in Wisconsin, which is the setting for his debut poetry collection, Yellowrocket (Norton, 2008). His poems have appeared in Poetry, Best American Poetry, and The New Yorker. His second collection, Pitch, will be published by W. W. Norton in Winter 2012. He is the co-founder of Motionpoems, a poetry film initiative. He lives in Saint Paul, Minnesota, where he is the poet laureate of Nina's Cafe. More information about Todd Boss is available on his website, http://www.toddbosspoet.com/.

Thomas Larson

Thomas Larson, visiting editor in creative nonfiction, is the author of The Saddest Music Ever Written: The Story of Samuel Barber’s “Adagio for Strings” and The Memoir and the Memoirist: Reading and Writing Personal Narrative, Ohio University Press / Swallow Press, now in its third printing. He teaches, lectures, and holds workshops on memoir writing throughout the United States.



Thomas Larson

Larson writes personal essays, memoir, feature articles, book reviews, and literary criticism. For the last twelve years, he has been a contributing writer for the weekly San Diego Reader where he specializes in investigative journalism, narrative nonfiction, and profiles.

His writing has appeared in numerous reviews and journals, among them Tampa Review, The Gettysburg Review, Southwest Review, Antioch Review, Fourth Genre, Amazon.com/Shorts, the Anchor Essay Annual: The Best of 1997, Contrary Magazine online (where he does quarterly book reviews), and New Letters (where his memoir, "Mrs. Wright’s Bookshop," won the journal’s Reader’s Award for the Essay in 2008).

His web site is www.thomaslarson.com.


Michael Steinberg


Michael Steinberg
Michael Steinberg, visiting editor in creative nonfiction, has written and edited five books, and his essays and memoirs have appeared in many literary journals and anthologies. In 2004, ForeWord Magazine chose Still Pitching as the Independent Press Memoir of the Year. The Association of American University Presses also listed it in “Books Selected for School Libraries.”

Other titles include Peninsula: Essays and Memoirs From Michigan—a finalist for both the 2000 ForeWord Magazine Independent Press Anthology of the Year and the 2000 Great Lakes Book Sellers Award; and an anthology, The Fourth Genre: Contemporary Writers of/on Creative Nonfiction, co-edited with Robert Root, now in its sixth edition.

Steinberg has been a guest writer at many colleges and universities and at several national and international writers’ conferences, including the Prague Summer Writing Program, the Paris Writers’ Conference, The Kachemak Bay/Alaska Writers’ Conference, the Geneva Writers’ Conference, Writers in Paradise, and the Chautauqua Writers’ Center, among others. Currently, he is writer-in-residence at the Solstice/Pine Manor low-residency MFA program.

His website is http://www.mjsteinberg.net/.

Tuesday, August 2, 2011

Tuesday, August 2, 2011

Today's Events:


All posted events are located in the Schar College of Education Ronk Lecture Hall, Ashland University in Ashland, Ohio and are free and open to the public.

1 p.m. Craft Seminar with Kathleen Norris
 
7 p.m. MFA Faculty Reading with Leila Philip, Mark Irwin, and Angie Estes
 
About the Presenters:
 
Angie Estes

Angie Estes
Angie Estes, poetry, is the author of four books, most recently Tryst (Oberlin College Press, 2009), which was selected as one of two finalists for the 2010 Pulitzer Prize. Her previous book, Chez Nous, also from Oberlin, appeared in 2005. Her second book, Voice-Over (Oberlin College Press, 2002), won the 2001 FIELD Poetry Prize and was also awarded the 2001 Alice Fay di Castagnola Prize from the Poetry Society of America. Her first book, The Uses of Passion (1995), was the winner of the Peregrine Smith Poetry Prize. Her poems have appeared in numerous literary magazines, including TriQuarterly, The Paris Review, Ploughshares, Boston Review, and Slate, and in the anthologies Gondola Signore Gondola: Venice in 20th Century American Poetry (Supernova Edizioni, Venezia, 2007), Contemporary Poetry in the United States: A Bilingual English-Cyrillic Edition (Russia: OGI Press, 2007), Evensong: Contemporary American Poets on Spirituality (Bottom Dog Press, 2006), The Extraordinary Tide: New Poetry by American Women (Columbia University Press, 2001), and The Geography of Home: California and the Poetry of Place (Heyday Press, 1999). Her essays have appeared in FIELD, Lyric Poetry Review, Children’s Literature, Christianity and Literature, Little Women: Norton Critical Edition, and in Every Passing Breath: Contemporary Poets Respond to the Psalms.


The recipient of many awards, including a 2010 Guggenheim Fellowship, a Pushcart Prize and the Cecil Hemley Memorial Award from the Poetry Society of America, she has received fellowships, grants, and residencies from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Woodrow Wilson Foundation, the American Academy in Rome, the California Arts Council, the MacDowell Colony, and the Ohio Arts Council. Estes received her Ph.D. and M.A. in English from the University of Oregon and was for several years Professor of American Literature and Creative Writing at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo. Most recently, she has taught creative writing at Oberlin College, at University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, and at The Ohio State University. She is also a contributing editor for the literary magazine The Journal.

Mark Irwin

Mark Irwin
Mark Irwin, poetry, was born in Faribault, Minnesota, and has lived throughout the United States and abroad in France and Italy. His poetry and essays have appeared widely in many literary magazines including The American Poetry Review, The Atlantic, Georgia Review, The Kenyon Review, Paris Review, Poetry, The Nation, New England Review, and the New Republic. A graduate of the Iowa Writer’s Workshop (M.F.A.), he also holds a Ph.D. in English/Comparative Literature and has taught at a number of universities and colleges including Case Western Reserve, the University of Iowa, Ohio University, the University of Denver, the University of Colorado/Boulder, the University of Nevada, and Colorado College.


The author of six collections of poetry, including The Halo of Desire (Galileo Press, 1987), Against the Meanwhile (Wesleyan University Press, 1989), Quick, Now, Always (BOA , 1996), White City (BOA, 2000), Bright Hunger (BOA, 2004), and Tall If (New Issues, 2008), he has also translated two volumes of poetry, one from the French and one from the Romanian. Recognition for his work includes The Nation/Discovery Award, four Pushcart Prizes, National Endowment for the Arts, Colorado and Ohio Art Council Fellowships, two Colorado Book Awards, the James Wright Poetry Award, and fellowships from the Fulbright, Lilly, and Wurlitzer Foundations. He lives in Colorado, and Los Angeles, where he teaches in the Graduate Creative Writing Program at the University of Southern California.

Kathleen Norris

Kathleen Norris
Kathleen Norris, visiting writer in creative nonfiction, is the award-winning poet, writer, and author of The New York Times bestsellers The Cloister Walk, Dakota: A Spiritual Geography, Amazing Grace: A Vocabulary of Faith, and The Virgin of Bennington.


Kathleen Norris has published seven books of poetry. Her first book of poems was entitled Falling Off and was the 1971 winner of the Big Table Younger Poets Award. Soon after, she settled down in her grandparents’ home in Lemmon, South Dakota, where she lived with her husband, the poet David Dwyer, for over twenty-five years. The move was the inspiration for the first of her nonfiction books, the award-winning bestseller Dakota: A Spiritual Geography. It was a New York Times Notable Book of the Year and was selected as one of the best books of the year by Library Journal.

Her next book, The Cloister Walk, is structured as a diary of her monastic experience interspersed with meditations on virgin saints, Emily Dickinson, celibacy, loneliness, monogamy, and a hymnist of the early church, Ephrem of Syria. Her book Amazing Grace continues her theme that the spiritual world is rooted in the chaos of daily life. Her book, The Virgin of Bennington, is a continuous narrative in which she shares the period of her life before Dakota. Other books include Journey: New and Selected Poems, and Little Girls in Church.

Kathleen Norris is the recipient of grants from the Bush and Guggenheim Foundations. Her new book, entitled Acedia & Me: A Marriage, Monks, and a Writer's Life, was published in September 2008. It is a study of acedia, the ancient word for the spiritual side of sloth. She examines the topic in the light of theology, psychology, monastic spirituality, and her own experience.

Widowed in 2003, Kathleen Norris now resides in Hawaii, where she volunteers at her local Episcopal Church. She travels to the mainland regularly to speak to students, medical professionals, social workers, and chaplains at colleges and universities, as well as churches and teaching hospitals.
Leila Philip

Leila Philip
Leila Philip, creative nonfiction, joined the MFA faculty in January 2011. She is the author of A Family Place (SUNY, 2009) and The Road Through Miyama (Random House, 1989), which won the PEN 1990 Martha Albrand Citation for Nonfiction. She has received awards for her writing from the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Guggenheim Foundation. She is Professor of Creative Writing and Literature at the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester.

Monday, August 1, 2011

Monday, August 1, 2011

Today's Events:

All posted events are located in the Schar College of Education Ronk Lecture Hall, Ashland University in Ashland, Ohio and are free and open to the public.


1 p.m. - “A New Lyric: On the ‘I’ and ‘You’ and Subjectivity” with Carmen Giménez Smith
 
7 p.m. - Reading by Kathleen Norris


About the Presenters:

Carmen Giménez Smith

Carmen Gimenez Smith
Carmen Giménez Smith has joined the MFA faculty in poetry. She is assistant professor of English at New Mexico State University, publisher for Noemi Press and Editor-in-Chief of Puerto del Sol. She is the author of the poetry collections Odalisque in Pieces (University of Arizona, 2009) and Trees Outside the Academy (Center for Literary Publishing, 2011) and the memoir Bring Down the Little Birds (University of Arizona, 2010). She also co-edited, with Kate Bernheimer, the anthology, My Mother She Killed Me, My Father He Ate Me (Penguin, 2010). Her work has most recently appeared in Ploughshares, jubilat, A Public Space and Denver Quarterly. She lives in New Mexico with her husband Evan Lavender-Smith and their two children.

Kathleen Norris
Kathleen Norris, visiting writer in creative nonfiction, is the award-winning poet, writer, and author of The New York Times bestsellers The Cloister Walk, Dakota: A Spiritual Geography, Amazing Grace: A Vocabulary of Faith, and The Virgin of Bennington.

Kathleen Norris has published seven books of poetry. Her first book of poems was entitled Falling Off and was the 1971 winner of the Big Table Younger Poets Award. Soon after, she settled down in her grandparents’ home in Lemmon, South Dakota, where she lived with her husband, the poet David Dwyer, for over twenty-five years. The move was the inspiration for the first of her nonfiction books, the award-winning bestseller Dakota: A Spiritual Geography. It was a New York Times Notable Book of the Year and was selected as one of the best books of the year by Library Journal.


Kathleen Norris

Her next book, The Cloister Walk, is structured as a diary of her monastic experience interspersed with meditations on virgin saints, Emily Dickinson, celibacy, loneliness, monogamy, and a hymnist of the early church, Ephrem of Syria. Her book Amazing Grace continues her theme that the spiritual world is rooted in the chaos of daily life. Her book, The Virgin of Bennington, is a continuous narrative in which she shares the period of her life before Dakota. Other books include Journey: New and Selected Poems, and Little Girls in Church.

Kathleen Norris is the recipient of grants from the Bush and Guggenheim Foundations. Her new book, entitled Acedia & Me: A Marriage, Monks, and a Writer's Life, was published in September 2008. It is a study of acedia, the ancient word for the spiritual side of sloth. She examines the topic in the light of theology, psychology, monastic spirituality, and her own experience.

Widowed in 2003, Kathleen Norris now resides in Hawaii, where she volunteers at her local Episcopal Church. She travels to the mainland regularly to speak to students, medical professionals, social workers, and chaplains at colleges and universities, as well as churches and teaching hospitals.

Sunday, July 31, 2011

Sunday, July 31, 2011

Today's Events:

7 p.m. - MFA Faculty and Administrator Reading: Sonya Huber, Kathryn Winograd, and Sarah M. Wells

About the Presenters:

Sonya Huber

Sonya Huber
Sonya Huber is the author of two books of creative nonfiction, Cover Me: A Health Insurance Memoir (University of Nebraska Press, 2010), finalist for the 2010 Grub Street National Book Prize in Nonfiction, and Opa Nobody (University of Nebraska Press, 2008), shortlisted for the Saroyan Prize. She has also written a textbook, The Backwards Research Guide for Writers: Using Your Life for Reflection, Connection, and Inspiration (Equinox Publishing, forthcoming). Her work has been published in literary journals and magazines including Fourth Genre, Passages North, Hotel Amerika, Crab Orchard Review, The Chronicle of Higher Education, and the Washington Post Magazine, in other journals and in many anthologies. She teaches in the Department of Writing and Linguistics at Georgia Southern University.


Kathryn Winograd

Kathryn Winograd
Kathryn Winograd poetry, is the author of Air into Breath (Ashland Poetry Press, 2002), a 2003 Colorado Book Award Winner in Poetry. Winograd has been the recipient of a Colorado Artist Fellowship in Poetry, a Rocky Mountain Women’s Institute Associateship, and a co-winner of a Colorado Endowment for The Humanities Grant. She is a poetry faculty member for the University of Northern Colorado’s Middle Ground Project, a collaboration with the Navajo Nation funded by a Presidential Academy in American History and Civics Education grant. Recent and forthcoming publications include Calyx, Cricket Magazine, Cutthroat, Fourth Genre, Hotel Amerika, Literary Mama, and River Teeth.


Winograd is the co-author of two books on online learning and teaching, You Can Learn Online and You Can Teach Online (McGraw Hill, 2002) and author of Stepping Sideways Into Poetry (Scholastic, Inc., 2005), a classroom resource book for K12 teachers. Her poetry has appeared in literary journals such as TriQuarterly, The Denver Quarterly, The Colorado Review, The Journal, The Antioch Review, Kalliope, The Ohio Review, The Cincinnati Review, Water-Stone, Poets Laureate, Weber Studies and The New Yorker. She has published numerous articles and essays in publications such as Iris: A Journal Abut Women, Bloomsbury Review, The Herb Companion, Mountain Living, Natural Homes Magazine, Adjunct Advocate, Winds of Change, and Converge Magazine, as well as children's stories and poems in Cricket magazine and Shoofly: An Audio Magazine for Children. Her work has been nominated for the Pushcart Prize. Winograd received her Ph.D. in Literature and Creative Writing from the University of Denver, and a M.F.A. from the University of Iowa.

Sarah M. Wells
Sarah M. Wells

Sarah M. Wells, MFA Administrative Director, is the author of Acquiesce (Finishing Line Press, March 2009), winner of the 2008 Starting Gate Award. Her poetry has appeared or is forthcoming in Nimrod, Christianity & Literature, JAMA, Poetry East, The Fourth River, Ascent, Literary Mama, Alimentum, The New Formalist and elsewhere. She has received scholarships to attend the Key West Literary Seminar and West Chester Poetry Conference. Wells serves as the Managing Editor for the Ashland Poetry Press and River Teeth: A Journal of Nonfiction Narrative. She lives in Ashland with her husband, Brandon, and their three young children, Lydia, Elvis, and Henry.

Friday, July 29, 2011

Friday, July 29, 2011

Today's Events:

All posted events are located in the Schar College of Education Ronk Lecture Hall, Ashland University in Ashland, Ohio and are free and open to the public.

1-2:30 p.m. Craft Seminar with Tom French
7 p.m. Faculty Reading – Deborah Fleming and Joe Mackall



About the Presenters:


Thomas French

Thomas French, visiting writer in creative nonfiction, worked as a reporter for the St. Petersburg Times for 27 years, writing serialized book-length narratives that appeared in the newspaper one chapter at a time. One of his projects, Angels & Demons, was awarded a Pulitzer Prize for feature writing. French now teaches at Indiana University and in Goucher College's MFA program for creative nonfiction. He also teaches at the Poynter Institute for Media Studies and at writing conferences around the world, from Paris to Singapore to Johannesburg. He is the author of three nonfiction books, including Unanswered Cries, an account of a Florida murder case, and South of Heaven, the story of the secret lives of high school students. His most recent book, Zoo Story, is based on seven years of reporting and research and chronicles life and death inside Tampa's Lowry Park Zoo. A New York Times bestseller, Zoo Story was recently featured on The Colbert Report, in People Magazine and on NPR's Talk of the Nation.

Joe Mackall

Joe Mackall is the author of Plain Secrets: An Outsider among the Amish (Beacon Press, 2007) and The Last Street Before Cleveland: An Accidental Pilgrimage (University of Nebraska Press, 2006). He is the co-founder and co-editor of River Teeth: A Journal of Nonfiction Narrative and co-editor of the River Teeth Literary Nonfiction Book Prize Series (in partnership with the University of Nebraska Press).


His articles have been published in a number of newspapers and magazines, including The Washington Post and the Cleveland Plain Dealer. He wrote for The Washington Post for two years. He also served as editor of Cleveland Magazine. His essays have appeared in several anthologies, literary journals, and recently on National Public Radio’s “Morning Edition.” Mackall has a BA in English from Cleveland State University, an MA in English from the University of Central Oklahoma, an MFA in fiction writing from Bowling Green State University, and a Ph.D. in English from Indiana University of Pennsylvania. He is the director of the Creative Writing Program and Professor of English at Ashland University.


Deborah Fleming

Deborah Fleming, Professor of English, received her Ph.D. in 1985 from Ohio State University and is Chair of the Department and Editor of the Ashland Poetry Press. Her research interests include W. B. Yeats, Robinson Jeffers, Anglo-Irish Literature, Modern Poetry, and Environmentalist Literature. She is author of “A man who does not exist”: The Irish Peasant in W. B. Yeats and J. M. Synge from the University of Michigan Press and articles in such journals as Jeffers Studies, Eire-Ireland, and Papers in Comparative Literature. She has published a chapbook of poetry, Migrations, and individual poems appear in such journals as Hiram Poetry Review, Organization and Environment, Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment, Karamu, Cottonwood, Pennsylvania Review, and Blueline. A collection of poems, Morning, Winter Solstice, is forthcoming.  She received the Vandewater Poetry Award from Ohio State and a fellowship from the National Endowment for Humanities, and she had been a keynote speaker at the W. B. Yeats Society of New York and the Tor House Foundation Fall Festival.

Thursday, July 28, 2011

Thursday, July 28, 2011

Today's Events:

All posted events are located in the Schar College of Education Ronk Lecture Hall, Ashland University in Ashland, Ohio and are free and open to the public.

1-2:30 p.m. Poetry Faculty Craft Seminar: “Poetry and Memorability” with Mark Irwin and Peter Campion
7 p.m. Visiting Writer Reading: Tom French

About the Presenters:

Peter Campion
Peter Campion
Peter Campion, poetry, is the author of The Lions: Poems (University of Chicago Press, 2009), winner of the 2010 Larry Levis Reading Prize, Other People, (University of Chicago Press, 2005) and Mitchell Johnson (Terrence Rogers Fine Art, 2004). He was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in Poetry in 2011. He was also the 2009 recipient of the Rome Fellowship in Literature from The American Academy of Arts and Letters and has held a George Starbuck Lectureship at Boston University, as well as a Wallace Stegner Fellowship and Jones Lecturership at Stanford University. His poetry and prose have appeared recently in The Boston Globe, Modern Painters, The New Republic, Parnassus, Poetry, Poetry Northwest, Tikkun, The Yale Review and elsewhere. His monograph on the painter Joseph McNamara was published by The Seven Bridges Foundation. He has published catalog essays on such painters as Terry St. John, Kim Frohsin, Eric Aho, and Siddharth Parasnis. He won a Pushcart Prize in 2008.

Campion is the editor of the journal Literary Imagination. He is currently Assistant Professor of English at the University of Minnesota where he teaches creative writing, modern and contemporary poetry, prosody, and poetry and the visual arts.


Thomas French
Thomas French
Thomas French, visiting writer in creative nonfiction, worked as a reporter for the St. Petersburg Times for 27 years, writing serialized book-length narratives that appeared in the newspaper one chapter at a time. One of his projects, Angels & Demons, was awarded a Pulitzer Prize for feature writing. French now teaches at Indiana University and in Goucher College's MFA program for creative nonfiction. He also teaches at the Poynter Institute for Media Studies and at writing conferences around the world, from Paris to Singapore to Johannesburg. He is the author of three nonfiction books, including Unanswered Cries, an account of a Florida murder case, and South of Heaven, the story of the secret lives of high school students. His most recent book, Zoo Story, is based on seven years of reporting and research and chronicles life and death inside Tampa's Lowry Park Zoo. A New York Times bestseller, Zoo Story was recently featured on The Colbert Report, in People Magazine and on NPR's Talk of the Nation.


Mark Irwin
Mark Irwin, poetry, was born in Faribault, Minnesota, and has lived throughout the United States and abroad in France and Italy. His poetry and essays have appeared widely in many literary magazines including The American Poetry Review, The Atlantic, Georgia Review, The Kenyon Review, Paris Review, Poetry, The Nation, New England Review, and the New Republic. A graduate of the Iowa Writer’s Workshop (M.F.A.), he also holds a Ph.D. in English/Comparative Literature and has taught at a number of universities and colleges including Case Western Reserve, the University of Iowa, Ohio University, the University of Denver, the University of Colorado/Boulder, the University of Nevada, and Colorado College. 

Mark Irwin
The author of six collections of poetry, including The Halo of Desire (Galileo Press, 1987), Against the Meanwhile (Wesleyan University Press, 1989), Quick, Now, Always (BOA , 1996), White City (BOA, 2000), Bright Hunger (BOA, 2004), and Tall If (New Issues, 2008), he has also translated two volumes of poetry, one from the French and one from the Romanian. Recognition for his work includes The Nation/Discovery Award, four Pushcart Prizes, National Endowment for the Arts, Colorado and Ohio Art Council Fellowships, two Colorado Book Awards, the James Wright Poetry Award, and fellowships from the Fulbright, Lilly, and Wurlitzer Foundations. He lives in Colorado, and Los Angeles, where he teaches in the Graduate Creative Writing Program at the University of Southern California.


Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Today's Events:

All posted events are located in the Schar College of Education Ronk Lecture Hall, Ashland University in Ashland, Ohio and are free and open to the public.
 
7 p.m. MFA Faculty Reading: Bob Cowser, Ruth L. Schwartz, and Jill Christman
 
About Today's Presenters:


Jill Christman
Jill Christman

Jill Christman’s memoir, Darkroom: A Family Exposure, won the AWP Award Series in Creative Nonfiction and was published by the University of Georgia Press in 2002. Recent essays appearing in River Teeth and Harpur Palate have been honored by Pushcart nominations and her writing has been published in Barrelhouse, Brevity, Descant, Literary Mama, Mississippi Review, Wondertime, and many other journals, magazines, and anthologies. Her work has appeared on Indiana Public Radio and in anthologies, including Writer’s Digest’s Rules of Thumb, Unbuttoned: Women tell the truth about the pains, pleasures and politics of breastfeeding, and Literature: the Human Experience. She is an Associate Professor of English at Ball State University where she teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in creative nonfiction writing in the Creative Writing program and serves as Assistant Chair of Graduate and Undergraduate Programs in the Department of English.

Bob Cowser, Jr.
Bob Cowser, Jr.

Bob Cowser, Jr. is the author of three works of literary nonfiction and editor of a fourth. His most recent, Green Fields: Crime, Punishment, and a Boyhood Between, was published as part of the Engaged Writers Series at the University of New Orleans Press in 2010. A Professor of English at St. Lawrence University and on the faculty of the Low-Residency MFA at Ashland University, Cowser's essays and reviews have appeared widely in literary magazines and journals, including Creative Nonfiction, Fourth Genre, Brevity, and The Huffington Post. He lives on the Grasse River in Canton, NY with his wife Candace and their sons Jackson and Mason.

Ruth L. Schwartz
Ruth L. Schwartz, poetry, is the author of four books of poems, each the winner of a national award: Dear Good Naked Morning (Autumn House Press, 2005), selected by Alicia Ostriker for the 2004 Autumn House Poetry Prize; Edgewater (HarperCollins, 2002), a National Poetry Series winner chosen by Jane Hirshfield; Singular Bodies (Anhinga Press, 2001), recipient of the 2000 Anhinga Prize for Poetry; and Accordion Breathing and Dancing (University of Pittsburgh Press, 1996), winner of the 1994 Associated Writing Programs Competition. Her fifth collection of poems, Bone River, will be published by Autumn House Press in 2012. Ruth is also the author of a memoir, Death in Reverse: A Love Story (Michigan State University Press, 2004), and her creative nonfiction has appeared in the Utne Reader, The Sun, and numerous anthologies.

Ruth L. Schwartz
Recipient of over a dozen national writing awards, including fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Ohio Arts Council, and the Astraea Foundation, Ruth is also a lifelong explorer of consciousness and healing. In addition to her M.F.A. in Creative Writing, Ruth has a Ph.D. in Transpersonal Psychology, and offers workshops and retreats nationwide on the theme “The Writer As Shaman: Words as a Portal to the Soul.” Her website is http://www.thewriterasshaman.com/.